Best Table Saws

Table saws are an essential tool in any woodworker’s workshop as they provide a clean and precise cut. They’re versatile and can be used for a range of different DIY jobs. Before buying a table saw, what are the factors that you should consider? Keep reading…

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Based on 89 reviews
DeWalt 254mm DWE7491-XE

DeWalt 254mm DWE7491-XE

3.6  (12)
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McPop
McPopAU51 posts
  Verified
W Pex
W Pex
 
Second replacement sawFirst saw lasted 13 months. under warranty took 3 month then was replaced with a brand new saw. This one as a hobbyist has just failed after 17 months. Very poor saws Show details
DeWalt 745

DeWalt 745

3.9  (8)
Andrew Ford
Andrew FordMelbourne29 posts
 
Bosch GTS10XC

Bosch GTS10XC

3.4  (8)
Steve
SteveWA2 posts
 
Warranty repairThe saw itself is ok, until it broke, lucky for me it was still under warranty.that has now been over 10 weeks since I took it in for repairs. What a joke, ever time I ring they say it should be done in a couple of days!! Let’s see if it back after 11 weeks. This has put me off buying Bosch in the future. Very poor service.
Ryobi RTS1825RG

Ryobi RTS1825RG

2.6  (13)
Graham
GrahamQLD2 posts
 
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VinT
VinT5 posts
 
Ozito TSB-0808

Ozito TSB-0808

2.8  (5)
Happy Customer
Happy Customer
 
PerfectVery happy with this wee table saw. Nice n compact for easy storage. Perfect for what I need it to do. The fence is not the best. However have used a piece of angle and two F clamps. Works perfect. Stop complaining about this saw. You get what you pay for. Try spending more money to get something that suits. Stop trying to be cheap.
 Show details
Kurt S.
Kurt S.3 posts
 
Coonabarabran Men's Shed
Coonabarabran Men's ShedNSW
  Verified
Everything we wished forHas already been used numerous times with great satisfaction and being used each day we attend, being 2 days per week. As older folk\s we appreciate the safety features and hope that it is not needed but they are there just in case. Show details
Baumr-AG BTS90

Baumr-AG BTS90

3.0  (3)
David
David
 
You get what you pay forAfter assembling strictly following instruction. The plastic body ensures it will always feel unsteady. As that is where the legs attach. Why Plastic? It feels cheap but for a sometime DIYer would suffice. Show details
Baumr-AG
Baumr-AG   DM   
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Hitachi C10RC

Hitachi C10RC

3.5  (2)
Matthew Webb
Matthew WebbQLD2 posts
 
I am very happy with the Hikoki Table sawI bought the saw for traditional woodworking. The saw was very easy to assemble and was accurate out of the box and the dust extraction sprays overy out most particles except for very big slices. The fold out trolley is exceptionally well made and functional. I have a shop vac hooked up now and it works well. Show details
Dewalt 8-1/4" Compact Table Saw DWE7485

Dewalt 8-1/4" Compact Table Saw DWE7485

3.5  (2)
 Summary
Frank M.
Frank M.TAS2 posts
 
Proxxon FET Table Saw

Proxxon FET Table Saw

3.5  (2)
Tim Johns
Tim JohnsNSW21 posts
  Verified
Ozito TBS-2000

Ozito TBS-2000

2.3  (4)
Don N.
Don N.SA11 posts
  Fair Incentive
Adequate for what you payI found this saw quite challenging to assemble. I find Ikea furniture very easy. As a woodworker once the saw was tuned it gave good results it is underpowered if you are cutting thick jarrah. the table is small compared to a commercial table saw that costs 20 times as much. The blades that come with it are basic but adequate. Show details
Festool PRECISIO CS 50 Table Saw

Festool PRECISIO CS 50 Table Saw

5.0  (1)
 Summary
Leon Mosello
Leon MoselloVIC
  Verified
It beats any other table saw / drop saw in oneLight easy to carry around one in two tools. Dropsaw and table saw as one. Looks professional and great in dust free with Vacume. I also got the cs70 for bigger jobs to Show details ·  1
Makita MLT100N

Makita MLT100N

3.0  (2)
teddymobbs
teddymobbsNSW8 posts
  Verified
This is perfect for me I used it all day. A bit noisy, my wife says. I use ear protection. Having said that all cut timber was perfect. Extra time was put in to ensure square cuts, but worth the time. I love the Electric brake feature. Very happy so far. Purchased Aug2021
Evolution R255MTS

Evolution R255MTS

4.0  (1)
Shaxpier
ShaxpierNSW115 posts
  Verified
Electronic W.O.F.T.
Electronic W.O.F.T.3 posts
 
Dewalt D28710

Dewalt D28710

4.0  (1)
Ab
AbBrisbane11 posts
 
Love dewaltDewalt, what more can I say the BEST. Dewalt never disappoints me, great reliable product that I have professionally and in my personal garage. Good power, have never burnt it out even after some abuse. I buy dewalt as gifts for my siblings because I trust it.

Bosch GHO 40-82 C Professional

Bosch GHO 40-82 C Professional

4.0  (1)
Adrian
AdrianVictoria
 
Ozito Router Table RTB-003

Ozito Router Table RTB-003

2.0  (2)
Don N.
Don N.SA11 posts
 
Hafco Woodmaster ST-254

Hafco Woodmaster ST-254

3.0  (1)
Happy Gardener
Happy GardenerVIC14 posts
 
Kathy
KathyBrisbane
 

Man using a table saw

Universal vs. induction saws

Universal motorInduction motor
Portability
Durability
Affordability 
Speed
Energy rating
Reduced noise
Dual power source

There are two primary types of motors that are used to power your saws. They differ in performance and price tags.

Induction motors are heavier than universal motors, making them less portable but more ideal for stationary tools to reduce rattling and improve stability. They can only run on a mains power and need to be plugged in. Because they are more durable and made with copper or stainless steel, they are more expensive and can be found in the top of the range saws.

Saws with induction motors have a slower maximum speed and less torque at the start-up - meaning they may not be suitable for tasks that involve starting and stopping frequently. However, they have a longer life compared to universal motors, a higher energy efficiency rating and are much quieter than universal motors.

On the opposite end, universal motors are lightweight and suitable for use as portable saws - being able to run on both mains and battery power. They are affordable and have no limit on speeds and have great torque whilst starting up.

The downsides are that they may need replacing more often than induction motors, they tend to make much more noise and are less energy efficient.

You should invest in a motor type depending on how often you’ll be using your table saw and the type of projects you’ll be working on.

Types of table saws

There are many types of table saws on the market and the one you choose should be based on your budget, the space you have available, what you will be using it for and how adept you are at woodworking. With that in mind, here are the types of table saws available.

Portable

For those who value easy portability and storage - primarily those working in their garages or on various job sites, portable saws are the way to go. They are lightweight, can be stored away easily and are designed to be placed on tables or portable workbenches.

They come in three handy models: benchtop, compact, and jobsite table saws.

Benchtop table saws

These saws should be placed on a table or workbench as they don’t come with a support stand. They’re lightweight and a good choice for homeowner and casual DIYers.

Benchtop table saws are powered by a universal motor and are extremely portable. They can be moved and set to a different height to produce cuts with different depths.

These types of table saws are the most affordable, providing excellent value for money. They can, however, be noisier and less durable than bigger and more expensive models.

Compact table saws

Compact saws are larger than benchtop models but smaller than contractor saws. They sit on a stationary stand and are generally driven by small toothed belts with a universal motor. They are similar to, but smaller and made of lighter materials than a contractor saw.

Jobsite table saws

Jobsite table saws come mounted on a stand. They’re larger than benchtop models but still easily portable and used by trade professionals who commute to job sites. They’re also more robust in order to be able to withstand use on construction sites.

Stationary table saws

Stationary saws are generally used by serious woodworking enthusiasts and cabinet makers. They are larger, more robust and can provide more precise cuts than portable table saws. Models include contractor, hybrid, and cabinet table saws.

Contractor table saws

Also referred to as open-stand saws, they are larger and heavier than portable table saws and come with an attached stand (which is usually on wheels). They use an induction type motor for a steadier cut.

Many DIY hobbyists and homeowners can benefit from buying this type of saw if they wish to get a stationary one because standard electrical circuits provide adequate power to run them and they are fairly affordable when compared to other large saws.

A potential downside is that the motor hangs off the rear of the saw meaning dust collection may be difficult.

Cabinet table saws

Cabinet table saws are typically the most expensive and powerful. They are made of cast iron and steel to minimise vibration and increase accuracy. They’re built with an enclosed base for superior dust collection and feature an induction motor in the 3 to 5 horsepower range.

They’re most suitable for professional use and are a great investment for woodworking enthusiasts. Designed to be durable and robust, these models will last for many years.

However, because they are large, they will require a large amount of dedicated space and can not be stored away.

Hybrid table saws

Hybrid saws provide many features that are present in a high-end cabinet and contractor saws at a reduced cost.

They are, in essence, contractor saws mounted to a tabletop with a cabinet stand. Most come with an enclosed cabinet design, but some offer an open leg style of design to improve dust collection.

They are not as robust as cabinet saws but are still an upgrade from a contractor saw. They offer good value for money.

What to look for in a good table saw

Now that you’ve chosen which type of saw you want, you’ll want to choose your specific saw. Here are the things you should look out for:

Blade: One of the most important features of the table saw is the quality of the blade. Look out for the number of teeth, kerf and arbor size, diameter, application, speed and material of the blade.

For reference, the standard blade diameter is 10” which gives a 3-½” cut capacity at 90 degrees. Blades can be made out of carbide, carbon or diamond-tipped teeth.

Power: Many blades these days can cut through materials other than wood. Knowing which materials you want to work with in the future will guide your decision-making process in this category.

The amps (current) refer to the power output of the table saw. The higher the amps, the more power the saw has to cut dense material. Purchase a saw that is powerful enough for your required tasks.

Flat top: The most accurate cuts can only be made on flat tables. Check your saw’s flatness deviation (0.005” is typically acceptable for a cabinet saw).

Rip fence type: The fence, also known as a rip fence is a cutting guide that goes from the front of the table to the back. This should be perfectly parallel to the cutting plane of the blade and should lock down solidly.

It’s important to have a reliable fence that doesn’t move out of position to ensure a clean cut.

The rip capacity is also important to consider as it determines the maximum width of any material that you’d like to cut.

Miter gauge: A miter gauge is a device used for holding workpieces at a set angle while being cut on table saws - look for an accurate miter gauge with stops at 45 and 90 degrees.

Standard mitre slot: While Australian table saws will all use the standard 19 x 9.5mm mitre slot, suiting all standard accessories, European table saws will use different sized slots so be careful if purchasing a table saw from abroad.

Arbor locks: An arbor lock provides a simple and safer locking mechanism that prevents the blade from spinning while you lock it in place. Usually, the arbor hole is 5/8″ in diameter. Having ill-fitting arbor locks can making changing blades a tiresome process.

Storage: Some table saws can offer a storage compartment to place your tools and accessories such as safety glasses, rip fence and blades. This can be highly useful and provide a compact and tidy appearance.

Dust collection: If you’ll be using the saw inside and you want to keep things tidy, make sure the saw has a dust port available to connect a dust collector to it.

Bevel capability: When making angled cuts, most table saws allow you to tilt the blade to the left for angled cuts, some also tilt to the right - try to choose a saw that matches your personal preference and provides accurate, clean angled cuts.

Ease of use: Consider how easy the product is to understand and use as this could affect the quality of your work and your safety. Some portable table saws don’t come assembled so take into consideration the effort of setting up a table saw or buying one pre-installed. Take into account how easy it is to change the blade and make certain types of cuts such as grooved or angled cuts.

Safety: Table saws are very safe when used responsibly with all the guards in place, however, for extra safety, some saws come with an automatic brake that goes into effect when the blade touches the skin. It could also be worth investing in a safety on/off switch that you can turn off with your knees as your hands might be occupied while holding onto some wood.

You can read reviews on the top table saws on our website today!

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