Best Caravans

A caravan can help you feel right at home wherever you travel. Among caravans for sale today you can find everything from your run of the mill trailers to off-road caravans with the brawn to tackle tough trails - either way, knowing what to look for will help you find a van that's right for you. Continue reading...

444 listings
JB Caravans

JB Caravans

 · includes 29 listings
4.1 from 30 reviews

JB Caravans have the brawn to get you across all kinds of terrains, letting you explore off the beaten path.

  • Effortless to tow

  • Exceptional and prompt servicing

  • Highly durable

  • Value for Money
    4.0 (4)
  • Cleaning & Maintenance
    4.0 (4)
  • Mileage 1,625 km
  • Interior Build Quality
    4.0 (5)
  • Off-roading Performance
    3.7 (3)
  • Exterior Build Quality
    4.0 (5)
  • Comfort
    4.0 (5)
  • Tare Weight2,180 kg to 3,290 kg
  • Travel Length7.3 m to 9.5 m
  • Off-Road CapableEither
  • Main Bed SizeKing Single and Queen
  • Bathroom / Laundry InclusionsToilet, Shower, Sink, Vanity and Washing Machine
New Age Manta Ray

New Age Manta Ray

 · includes 6 listings
3.9 from 33 reviews

The caravans in the New Age Manta Ray range are durable, comfortable, and available in a range of sizes for a variety of terrains - they’re built for travellers of all stripes.

  • Sturdy design

  • Simple to haul

  • Comfortable furnishings

  • Some finishes not particularly durable

  • Value for Money
    4.0 (4)
  • Cleaning & Maintenance
    4.3 (3)
  • Mileage 950 km
  • Interior Build Quality
    3.3 (4)
  • Off-roading Performance
    3.5 (2)
  • Exterior Build Quality
    2.8 (4)
  • Comfort
    4.0 (3)
  • Tare Weight1,840 kg to 2,300 kg
  • Travel Length7.232 m to 8.975 m
  • Off-Road CapableNo
  • Main Bed SizeQueen
  • Bathroom / Laundry InclusionsToilet, Shower, Sink, Vanity and Washing Machine
A'van Aspire Hardtop Series

A'van Aspire Hardtop Series

 · includes 13 listings
3.5 from 50 reviews

Offering easy hauling, a variety of layout options, and features that make your mobile home feel like a regular home, there’s a caravan in the A’van Aspire Hardtop Series for everyone.

  • Fuss-free towing

  • Spacious layout

  • Insufficient after sales service

  • Value for Money
    3.7 (7)
  • Cleaning & Maintenance
    3.9 (7)
  • Mileage 10,433.333 km
  • Interior Build Quality
    2.8 (6)
  • Off-roading Performance
    3.5 (2)
  • Exterior Build Quality
    3.8 (6)
  • Comfort
    3.7 (6)
  • Tare Weight1,070 kg to 1,250 kg
  • Travel Length5.33 m to 6.36 m
Adria Altea

Adria Altea

 · includes 4 listings
3.8 from 31 reviews

The Adria Altea combines functional, ergonomic living with contemporary interior decor to let you travel in comfort and style wherever you choose to go.

Ecotourer 510 Range

Ecotourer 510 Range

 · includes 6 listings
4.4 from 17 reviews

Caravans in the Ecotourer 510 Range offer spacious living and an aerodynamic design that makes for fuel efficient towing, so you can feel right at home on the road.

A'van Hardtop Series

A'van Hardtop Series

 · includes 18 listings
3.4 from 51 reviews

Latest review: tows verry well exelent good size van fore two & 2 dogs no real problems with sink tap leek but fixed promply i hav had many vans over lots of years top brands to but we are not only happy with

A'van Aliner

A'van Aliner

 · includes 6 listings
3.8 from 28 reviews

Latest review: The overall finish of the camper is pretty shoddy when you think what the asking price is. Others agree but reckon you can make improvements yourself, but why should

Jayco Silverline

Jayco Silverline

 · includes 14 listings
3.5 from 38 reviews

Latest review: We have a 2017 2165-4 and have travelled over 30000kms. No major problems whatsoever. Well looked after by Jayco Horsham. Tows well behind DMax. Would happily buy same van

A'van Cruiser & Cruiseliner

A'van Cruiser & Cruiseliner

 · includes 7 listings
3.3 from 49 reviews

Latest review: Air conditioning This seems to be a very common complaint, so won’t get standard aircon will find another solution. Towing Almost everyone says they tow well on the bitumen. Suspension Most people c

Empire Caravans

Empire Caravans

 · includes 6 listings
4.8 from 12 reviews

Latest review: Build quality is of excellent high standard. No leaks internal or external, van has been around aus twice no problems ever surfaced. Extremly reliable. Lay out is great, custom build built to set our

Jayco Expanda

Jayco Expanda

 · includes 10 listings
3.0 from 73 reviews

Latest review: Our Sterling Outback 17.55.7SH was purchased new in 2013 and after almost 50,000km of travel nothing significant has broken, fallen off, stopped working or leaked. With due care and reduced speed the

Majestic Caravans Knight

Majestic Caravans Knight

 · includes 12 listings
3.7 from 20 reviews

Latest review: I purchased at off road van 2020 before Covid hit and it’s a lemon. Would definitely not recommend this brand of van as it is put together by monkeys . Every time we go on a trip we have so many p

Jurgens Tooradin

Jurgens Tooradin

 · includes 3 listings
4.7 from 12 reviews

Latest review: We found the stabilizer legs also too far under the van to be used easily. We now put a stand under the tow bar and lower onto that - it is very stable and easy to use. The Tooradins are nose heavy

La Vista Caravans

La Vista Caravans

 · includes 7 listings
4.7 from 13 reviews

Latest review: We purchased our 19’6” Paloma in December 2017. It has a full off road G&S Chassis and twin shock independent suspension. We had a stove with oven fitted and the van is fully optioned with gen box, so

Golf Savannah

Golf Savannah

 · includes 6 listings
3.9 from 17 reviews

Latest review: This is my third caravan and by far the best one I've ever bought for camping. You feel safe inside from the elements and it really holds up in tough terrain and harsh weather. Its easy to clean with

Jayco Journey

Jayco Journey

 · includes 4 listings
2.9 from 66 reviews

Latest review: Having read the reviews for the jayco journey as was very apprehensive about buying one. One came up second hand and I thought they must be selling it coz they want to flogg it off. It was only 18

Leader Caravan Gold

Leader Caravan Gold

 · includes 8 listings
3.4 from 27 reviews

Latest review: Tows good quality not there anymore poor workmanship not finished like our 2012 supreme lots of small problems and not much back up poor hand over (35 mins ) even no gas in bottles ( always thought

Supreme Classic

Supreme Classic

 · includes 12 listings
3.3 from 23 reviews

Latest review: Tows well and is perfect for family getaways or lifetime adventures. Spacious enough for 4 to actually eat around the table - only plus would be if the table could slide easily out the way or be

Golf Bush Challenger

Golf Bush Challenger

 · includes 4 listings
3.1 from 26 reviews

Latest review: Great towing hardly know it's there. Feels like home and so nice when on beach as it does not obstruct views or breeze. Ours has aircon and also a great bonus when we have needed

Jurgens Lunagazer

Jurgens Lunagazer

 · includes 5 listings
3.8 from 13 reviews

Latest review: Bought ours two years ago when it was 8 months old and in excellent condition. The wallpaper finish was poor with spilled glue and the edges could be better. The van itself is well designed and we

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Types of caravans

An elderly couple relaxing by a river next to their caravan

While there are plenty of types of caravans to choose from, conventional caravans and pop-top caravans are the two most popular choices.

Conventional caravans

These have a solid roof and solid walls, neither of which can be adjusted. They’re also the most common type of caravan on the market.

Pros

  • Has more cupboard space than pop-tops.
  • Easier to set up.
  • Less vulnerable to leaks.
  • Can stay warmer in colder weather.
  • Cheaper than pop-tops.

Cons

  • Weigh more than pop-tops, so they're more difficult and expensive to tow.
  • Higher height may make them difficult to store in some carports and garages, and more difficult to manoeuvre along trails with low-hanging debris.

Pop-top caravans

Pop-top (or pop-up) caravans have a roof that can be lifted up or lowered. When the roof is raised, vinyl or canvas walls protect the interior of the van.

Pros

  • Reduced height makes them easier to store in garages, and may make it easier to take them along roads or tracks with a low clearance.
  • Provide more ventilation, making it great for hot or humid weather.
  • Often weigh less, so use less fuel to tow.

Cons

  • Often more expensive.
  • More vulnerable to water and dust leaks.
  • Often have less structural integrity than conventional caravans.
  • Offer less cupboard storage.
  • Mechanisms to pop and pull top back down are often highly mounted and aren’t ergonomic.

Other types of caravans

  • Pop-out caravans: These have a slide-out section that usually has sleeping berths or seating, allowing them to stay compact while being a great family caravan.
  • Fifth wheeler caravans: Fifth wheelers are the largest type of caravan you can find, and you’ll find these have the space to house luxurious interior features. Because of their size, you’ll need a sturdy vehicle to tow them, and you may find that not all caravan parks accept these vans.
  • Teardrop caravans: These are small caravans that are used by those who have a smaller towing vehicle or don’t need to carry all that much. They’ll usually have enough space for 2 people to sleep in as well as a kitchenette.
An image of a conventional caravan next to an image of a pop-top caravan
On the left: a conventional caravan. Image credit: New Age. On the right: a pop-top caravan. Image credit: A'van.

Should I get an off-road caravan?

If you’re itching to get off the bitumen, then you might find an off-road caravan is more suitable for you.

Off-roaders have more ground clearance, larger wheels, a more durable chassis, and suspension that can absorb road shock and tackle rough terrain. They also sometimes have larger water tanks, solar panels, and a more powerful battery system to allow for greater self-reliance when you’re off the grid.

Think about the type of adventures you plan on setting off for. Will you mainly be on paved roads, or will you need something that can tackle a dust road, rougher trails and even the odd river crossing?

Off-road campers are pricier, heavier, and more difficult to tow, so don’t overestimate your bravery - only opt for one if you really think you’ll need it.

What to consider when choosing a caravan

Weight and towing capacity

First-time caravan buyers will likely be confused at all the weights they need to consider when buying one. All of these weights are to ensure you can legally and safely tow your caravan.

These are the measurements you’ll need to check:

  • Your vehicle’s maximum towing capacity.
  • The tare weight of your caravan. This is the weight of an empty trailer (but including 10L of fuel).
  • The Aggregate Trailer Mass (ATM) of your caravan. This is the legal maximum weight of your caravan with a load, and is the combination of the tare weight and its payload (the maximum weight of cargo that can be loaded onto the trailer).
  • Your vehicle’s Gross Combination Mass (GCM). This is the maximum combined weight of the car and the caravan.
  • The ball weight, which is the maximum amount of pressure you can put on your vehicle’s towball.

Check with both your vehicle and caravan manufacturer about weights. You can also weigh both at a public weighbridge.

If you find that most caravans don’t suit your current towing capabilities and you don’t want to upgrade your vehicle, you may want to consider opting for a more lightweight camper trailer.

Size

Most caravans in Australia are somewhere between 11 and 24ft (even here, we generally measure caravans by feet). An 11ft camper usually sleeps 1 one person, while couples can often be comfortable in one between 19 to 20ft. Longer caravans are usually recommended for larger groups, with some caravans accommodating up to 7 people.

Check how easy your caravan will be to store, particularly if it needs to be parked in a garage or another kind of enclosed space. However, you shouldn’t settle for too tight a fit, as you’ll need a bit of swing room when making a turn out of the garage.

How large you decide to go will generally depend on your vehicle’s towing capacity, the number of sleeping berths you need the van to have, and what kind of interior features and components you want in your van.

Design

Just because you’re planning to live in a box doesn’t mean that you need to sign away a life of comfort. Well thought-out layouts can make even the smallest caravans feel spacious, and caravan manufacturers often offer a variety of layouts within a single model or range.

Think about how many campers you need your van to sleep and what kind of activities you want to do in your van - some people like space, while others prefer a cosier home that forces them to relax outdoors more often.

Also consider the colour of your van - the majority are white because they're cooler and white wall sheeting is more widely prouced, making them cheaper to purchase if you need repairs done.

Features

While most caravans come with sleeping berths, a kitchenette, a toilet and shower, and a living area, there are some extra features that you might want to look for when you shop. Deciding what features you want or need largely depends on personal preference - here are a few common ones for you to consider.

Interior features

Exterior features

You should also consider the following:

  • Water tank capacity. It’s generally a good idea to have at least 100L of fresh water on your caravan, particularly if you plan on free camping or travelling through National Parks.
  • Battery. You should have at least one battery of 100A/H or higher.
  • Grey water tank. A grey water tank helps you leave no trace, and while not all caravans have them as a standard feature, they’re an environmentally responsible fitting to have.

The more bells and whistles you want your caravan to have, the larger and heavier you should expect your caravan to be.

Build quality

Whether you want a caravan for the odd trip away or plan on making it your permanent home, you should look for a sturdy, well constructed van. Most caravans are made from either aluminium or fibreglass - neither is inherently better than the other, but both materials have benefits and drawbacks.

Aluminium

Fibreglass

  • Lighter, making it easier and cheaper to tow.
  • Less expensive.
  • Easier to repair.
  • Stronger and more resistant to denting.
  • Less likely to sustain hail damage.
  • Offers a smoother look (as opposed to a ribbed aluminium surface).

You can also look out for the joints between panels - usually, the fewer there are, the less likely your van will leak.

Price

Buying a caravan can set you back anywhere from $40,000 to upwards of $120,000, while a second hand caravan can still cost you anywhere from $20,000.

Cheap caravans under $50,000 will generally be smaller in size and won’t sleep more than 4 people. Spending between $50,000 and $70,000 will usually get you a longer caravan with a larger dinette and bathroom, as well as more durable and stylish finishes.

Spending more than this can get you an off-road or luxury caravan, and these models will often include features like a full kitchen, top-grade suspension, and swanky upholstery.

Tips for when you shop

There are a few things to keep in mind when visiting caravan and camper trailer shops.

  • You can sometimes score a better deal for a caravan in the summer (ideally December or January) as campers are already off on holiday and RV sales are generally quite low.
  • Ask the caravan dealer what kind of ongoing customer service they provide, taking note of relevant warranties, whether they offer roadside assistance and where they source parts. This will give you a good indication of where you can get help, and how long you’d have to wait if you need repairs.
  • Inspect a caravan closely when you’re shopping around as well as during the handover after you’ve purchased one. Checking the finishes, how secure the furniture and appliances are, and how comfortable the caravan is can save you having to make a detour to a service centre in the middle of your holiday.

One way to try before you buy is to rent a caravan for your next weekend getaway - if you have a few trips planned, you can road test different models to see which style and layout suits your needs.

Whether you’re perusing through new or used caravans for sale, knowing what to look for will help you get on the road with a camper that’s just right for you.