Best Caravans

A caravan can help you feel right at home wherever you travel. Among caravans for sale today you can find everything from your run of the mill trailers to off-road caravans with the brawn to tackle tough trails - either way, knowing what to look for will help you find a van that's right for you. Continue reading...

Brand
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Rating
Price
$17,244 to $253,479
$17,244
$253,479
Sleeping Capacity
2 people
Number of Axles
1
Tare Weight
600 kg
Travel Length
4.015 m
Depth
2,000 mm
9,200 mm
Width
250 mm
6,700 mm
Height
1,610 mm
3,110 mm
Off-Road Capable
Expander
Pop-Top
Main Bed Size
Bathroom / Laundry Inclusions
Exterior Features
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Interior Features
Kitchen Inclusions
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Based on 910 reviews
Jayco Silverline

Jayco Silverline

3.6  (49)
 Summary
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Gabby
GabbyVIC2 posts
  21 ft Silverline 21.65-3 Outback
Adria Altea

Adria Altea

3.8  (36)
 Summary
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Lwyk
Lwyk7 posts
  552PK
Perfect lightweight caravan for familyWe absolutely love our caravan and use it for trips of up to 4 hours each way.
I'm not sure it would be good for longhaul trips but it's great for our holidays in Sydney as a family. Show details
A'van Aspire Hardtop Series

A'van Aspire Hardtop Series

3.5  (55)
 Summary
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G Muir
G MuirVIC6 posts
  Aspire Hardtop 555 Double
New Age Manta Ray

New Age Manta Ray

3.7  (36)
 Summary
Sam D.
Sam D.7 posts
  18ft Ensuite Rear Door
A'van Aliner

A'van Aliner

3.8  (29)
 Summary
James
JamesSA4 posts
  1D
A'van Hardtop Series

A'van Hardtop Series

3.4  (53)
 Summary
Jensen Owner
Jensen Owner
  Hardtop 609 Jensen
Great vanA good van - have only owned for a couple of months so far. I am more concerned that you have people posting a review about a van having not even used one? Instead they post a review based only on other reviews they have read - not first hand experience. Simply damages credibilty of your review site I believe.
La Vista Caravans

La Vista Caravans

4.5  (15)
 Summary
Clarrie
ClarrieNSW2 posts
  Latina
Trouble free vanWell we have had our Latina now for 6 years, traveled about 6000 kls. per year and still had no problems with it. Leak free, tows well and everything still works well. In my late seventy's now so will probably not buy another van but if I did it would be a La Vista. Show details
A'van Cruiser & Cruiseliner

A'van Cruiser & Cruiseliner

3.3  (50)
 Summary
xyang
xyang5 posts
  Fair Incentive Verified 1D
Empire Caravans

Empire Caravans

4.7  (13)
 Summary
paul l.
paul l.New South Wales3 posts
  Emperor
not happyhave had no problems with van.problem is the company will not reply to emails or answer the phone. so if you have a question about van what do you do. unprofessionable
Leader Caravan Gold

Leader Caravan Gold

3.4  (29)
 Summary
dave
daveQLD
  Family 25'
2019 Goldgood to tow, issues with tow ball weight but Leader moved the water tanks back. three years in and need to replace roof and hatch fittings as they have crumbled and water destroyed the ceiling. Half of life has been under covers. Show details
Jayco Journey Pop Top

Jayco Journey Pop Top

2.9  (85)
 Summary
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Brendan Duffy
Brendan DuffyWA
  17ft Touring
Cheap jayco workmanshipBought van new in 2023 from dealer in perth. 1st trip the table fell apart. Held on with 5mm screws and some silicone.
Then it was the towel rack, again 5mm screws.
Now the front window cover has popped open on its own while im driving. One of the closing tabs had broke off.
Never buy a jayco again.
Just ruins the well planned trips away. Show details
Golf Savannah

Golf Savannah

3.8  (17)
 Summary
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Leanne T.
Leanne T.6 posts
  Savannah
Concept Innovation

Concept Innovation

4.1  (13)
 Summary
Michelle C.
Michelle C.2 posts
  590/600 Series
Golf Bush Challenger

Golf Bush Challenger

3.1  (28)
 Summary
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jevers59
jevers59SA
  Bush Challenger 1
Where are jacking points on 2018 bush challenger with alko enduro suspensionWhere are the jacking point on 2018 golf bush challenger Show details
Supreme Classic

Supreme Classic

3.1  (28)
 Summary
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Helen T.
Helen T.SA3 posts
  Classic
Helen T.
Helen T.  
More

I was hoping Supreme would reply to this and have some help for us, it was our first trip!

JB Caravans Scorpion Sting

JB Caravans Scorpion Sting

4.1  (12)
 Summary
Tracey and Phil
Tracey and PhilSouth Australia9 posts
  Verified 20'6" Tourer
Majestic Caravans Knight

Majestic Caravans Knight

3.1  (28)
 Summary
Michael K.
Michael K.Tasmania
  Caravans Knight
JB Caravans Dirt Roader

JB Caravans Dirt Roader

4.8  (8)
 Summary
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Ricky Barron
Ricky BarronQLD4 posts
  Verified 23' Extreme
Great van with a few build quality issuesAwning was badly fitted. Needed a replacement after 2 years. Dometic 9000. Otherwise a great van. Would be 5 stars if supplied with better quality fixtures and workmanship. After lots of kms and 2.5 years fulltime on the road our DRX is a solid, reliable, dry and safe home. Highly recommended. Just pay attention to Dometic appliances and awning. Show details
Supreme Territory

Supreme Territory

3.1  (20)
 Summary
Nick
NickPorongurup5 posts
  Territory
Option RV Traction Caravan

Option RV Traction Caravan

4.5  (8)
 Summary
  • Price (RRP) $76,990
Vince
VinceNSW4 posts
 
Crusader Excalibur

Crusader Excalibur

3.6  (11)
 Summary
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Sambo
SamboNSW
  Duke
Great CaravanNo
Problems towing in any conditions, sits behind the car well & is evenly balanced & smooth on the road. Show details
New Age Big Red

New Age Big Red

2.9  (19)
 Summary
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Joan H.
Joan H.2 posts
  22ft Club Lounge
New Age Oz Classic

New Age Oz Classic

3.5  (11)
 Summary
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Bev Smith
Bev SmithCranbourne3 posts
  18ft Ensuite
Supreme Executive

Supreme Executive

4.1  (8)
 Summary
Porky
Porky9 posts
  Supreme Executive
We love our Supreme Executive. Quality is good towes very easyWe have owned a Supreme Executive 21ft caravan for 15 months. We have travelled extensively through Qld Nsw Vic SA. With out any problems. We found the finish inside and out to be excellent and would recommend Supreme to any prospective buyer. We will travel the Nt and WA next year. We really love our Supreme.

 Show details

Roma Caravans Sov'reign

Roma Caravans Sov'reign

3.6  (10)
 Summary
Barrie
Barriebrisbane3 posts
  Sov'reign
Correct ATMJust purchased a 2004 17 foot Roma Sovereign. I removed everything that was not original to get an accurate tare weight, but over the scales it weighs heavier than the ATM on the plate. Any ideas and does anyone have a full set of specifications
Auto-Trail FB

Auto-Trail FB

5.0  (5)
 Summary
Wendy
WendyVIC2 posts
 
Atlantic Caravans New Generation

Atlantic Caravans New Generation

3.3  (10)
 Summary
Tamif060
Tamif060 WA
  New Generation
Majestic Navigator

Majestic Navigator

4.8  (5)
Freddy
FreddyWilliamstown
  Majestic Navigator
New Age Road Owl

New Age Road Owl

3.4  (9)
 Summary
Michael L
Michael LVIC
  18ft Ensuite
A'van Ray Slideout

A'van Ray Slideout

3.9  (7)
BKH
BKHVIC9 posts
  Ray

An elderly couple relaxing by a river next to their caravan

Types of caravans

While there are plenty of types of caravans to choose from, conventional caravans and pop-top caravans are the two most popular choices.

Conventional caravans

These have a solid roof and solid walls, neither of which can be adjusted. They’re also the most common type of caravan on the market.

Pros
Has more cupboard space than pop-tops.
Easier to set up.
Less vulnerable to leaks.
Can stay warmer in colder weather.
Cheaper than pop-tops.
Cons
Weigh more than pop-tops, so they're more difficult and expensive to tow.
Higher height may make them difficult to store in some carports and garages, and more difficult to manoeuvre along trails with low-hanging debris.

Pop-top caravans

Pop-top (or pop-up) caravans have a roof that can be lifted up or lowered. When the roof is raised, vinyl or canvas walls protect the interior of the van.

Pros
Reduced height makes them easier to store in garages, and may make it easier to take them along roads or tracks with a low clearance.
Provide more ventilation, making it great for hot or humid weather.
Often weigh less, so use less fuel to tow.
Cons
Often more expensive.
More vulnerable to water and dust leaks.
Often have less structural integrity than conventional caravans.
Offer less cupboard storage.
Mechanisms to pop and pull top back down are often highly mounted and aren’t ergonomic.

Other types of caravans

  • Pop-out caravans: These have a slide-out section that usually has sleeping berths or seating, allowing them to stay compact while being a great family caravan.
  • Fifth wheeler caravans: Fifth wheelers are the largest type of caravan you can find, and you’ll find these have the space to house luxurious interior features. Because of their size, you’ll need a sturdy vehicle to tow them, and you may find that not all caravan parks accept these vans.
  • Teardrop caravans: These are small caravans that are used by those who have a smaller towing vehicle or don’t need to carry all that much. They’ll usually have enough space for 2 people to sleep in as well as a kitchenette.
An image of a conventional caravan next to an image of a pop-top caravan
On the left: a conventional caravan. Image credit: New Age. On the right: a pop-top caravan. Image credit: A'van.

Should I get an off-road caravan?

If you’re itching to get off the bitumen, then you might find an off-road caravan is more suitable for you.

Off-roaders have more ground clearance, larger wheels, a more durable chassis, and suspension that can absorb road shock and tackle rough terrain. They also sometimes have larger water tanks, solar panels, and a more powerful battery system to allow for greater self-reliance when you’re off the grid.

Think about the type of adventures you plan on setting off for. Will you mainly be on paved roads, or will you need something that can tackle a dust road, rougher trails and even the odd river crossing?

Off-road campers are pricier, heavier, and more difficult to tow, so don’t overestimate your bravery - only opt for one if you really think you’ll need it.

What to consider when choosing a caravan

Weight and towing capacity

First-time caravan buyers will likely be confused at all the weights they need to consider when buying one. All of these weights are to ensure you can legally and safely tow your caravan.

These are the measurements you’ll need to check:

  • Your vehicle’s maximum towing capacity.
  • The tare weight of your caravan. This is the weight of an empty trailer (but including 10L of fuel).
  • The Aggregate Trailer Mass (ATM) of your caravan. This is the legal maximum weight of your caravan with a load, and is the combination of the tare weight and its payload (the maximum weight of cargo that can be loaded onto the trailer).
  • Your vehicle’s Gross Combination Mass (GCM). This is the maximum combined weight of the car and the caravan.
  • The ball weight, which is the maximum amount of pressure you can put on your vehicle’s towball.

Check with both your vehicle and caravan manufacturer about weights. You can also weigh both at a public weighbridge.

If you find that most caravans don’t suit your current towing capabilities and you don’t want to upgrade your vehicle, you may want to consider opting for a more lightweight camper trailer.

Size

Most caravans in Australia are somewhere between 11 and 24ft (even here, we generally measure caravans by feet). An 11ft camper usually sleeps 1 one person, while couples can often be comfortable in one between 19 to 20ft. Longer caravans are usually recommended for larger groups, with some caravans accommodating up to 7 people.

Check how easy your caravan will be to store, particularly if it needs to be parked in a garage or another kind of enclosed space. However, you shouldn’t settle for too tight a fit, as you’ll need a bit of swing room when making a turn out of the garage.

How large you decide to go will generally depend on your vehicle’s towing capacity, the number of sleeping berths you need the van to have, and what kind of interior features and components you want in your van.

Design

Just because you’re planning to live in a box doesn’t mean that you need to sign away a life of comfort. Well thought-out layouts can make even the smallest caravans feel spacious, and caravan manufacturers often offer a variety of layouts within a single model or range.

Think about how many campers you need your van to sleep and what kind of activities you want to do in your van - some people like space, while others prefer a cosier home that forces them to relax outdoors more often.

Also consider the colour of your van - the majority are white because they're cooler and white wall sheeting is more widely prouced, making them cheaper to purchase if you need repairs done.

Features

While most caravans come with sleeping berths, a kitchenette, a toilet and shower, and a living area, there are some extra features that you might want to look for when you shop. Deciding what features you want or need largely depends on personal preference - here are a few common ones for you to consider.

Interior featuresExterior features
- TV - air conditioner - fan - washing machine - Wi-Fi system- awning - patio light - reversing camera - external speakers - solar panels

You should also consider the following:

  • Water tank capacity. It’s generally a good idea to have at least 100L of fresh water on your caravan, particularly if you plan on free camping or travelling through National Parks.
  • Battery. You should have at least one battery of 100A/H or higher.
  • Grey water tank. A grey water tank helps you leave no trace, and while not all caravans have them as a standard feature, they’re an environmentally responsible fitting to have.

The more bells and whistles you want your caravan to have, the larger and heavier you should expect your caravan to be.

Build quality

Whether you want a caravan for the odd trip away or plan on making it your permanent home, you should look for a sturdy, well constructed van. Most caravans are made from either aluminium or fibreglass - neither is inherently better than the other, but both materials have benefits and drawbacks.

AluminiumFibreglass
- Lighter, making it easier and cheaper to tow. - Less expensive. - Easier to repair.- Stronger and more resistant to denting. - Less likely to sustain hail damage. - Offers a smoother look (as opposed to a ribbed aluminium surface).

You can also look out for the joints between panels - usually, the fewer there are, the less likely your van will leak.

Price

Buying a caravan can set you back anywhere from $40,000 to upwards of $120,000, while a second hand caravan can still cost you anywhere from $20,000.

Cheap caravans under $50,000 will generally be smaller in size and won’t sleep more than 4 people. Spending between $50,000 and $70,000 will usually get you a longer caravan with a larger dinette and bathroom, as well as more durable and stylish finishes.

Spending more than this can get you an off-road or luxury caravan, and these models will often include features like a full kitchen, top-grade suspension, and swanky upholstery.

Tips for when you shop

There are a few things to keep in mind when visiting caravan and camper trailer shops.

  • You can sometimes score a better deal for a caravan in the summer (ideally December or January) as campers are already off on holiday and RV sales are generally quite low.
  • Ask the caravan dealer what kind of ongoing customer service they provide, taking note of relevant warranties, whether they offer roadside assistance and where they source parts. This will give you a good indication of where you can get help, and how long you’d have to wait if you need repairs.
  • Inspect a caravan closely when you’re shopping around as well as during the handover after you’ve purchased one. Checking the finishes, how secure the furniture and appliances are, and how comfortable the caravan is can save you having to make a detour to a service centre in the middle of your holiday.

One way to try before you buy is to rent a caravan for your next weekend getaway - if you have a few trips planned, you can road test different models to see which style and layout suits your needs.

Whether you’re perusing through new or used caravans for sale, knowing what to look for will help you get on the road with a camper that’s just right for you.

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