Best Tents

A sturdy tent can be the ultimate home away from home when you’re out adventuring, which is why these shelters can make or break your experience. Whether you’re looking for a family tent, a roof top tent, or a beach tent, we go into what to look for so that you can make the most out of your next getaway. Continue reading...

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Rating
Price
$14 to $5,490
$14
$5,490
Tent Type
Sleeping Capacity
1 people
Room Type
Weight
1.45 kg
94.5 kg

Based on 802 reviews
Joolca Ensuite Double

Joolca Ensuite Double 🏆 2024

5.0  (26) Summary
Jethro
JethroTAS2 posts
  Verified
Outdoor Connection Brampton

Outdoor Connection Brampton 🏆 2024

5.0  (25) Summary
Helenaoncello
HelenaoncelloQLD12 posts
 
Coleman Instant Up

Coleman Instant Up

3.2  (70) Summary
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Charlotte v
Charlotte vQLD
  4
Seams peeled off after 2 usesOwned the tent for 4-5 years. Kept in garage. Opened it up for 3rd time. Seams had totally peeled off and whole tent stank of glue. Water was pouring in through the fabric. Thought Coleman would be more customer orientated but not interested as out of warranty. Manufacturer fault in my opinion. Show details
Black Wolf Turbo

Black Wolf Turbo

3.1  (64) Summary
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snowgnome
snowgnome
  300
Black Wolf Turbo Lite Plus

Black Wolf Turbo Lite Plus

3.5  (25) Summary
Serae
SeraeWA4 posts
  300
Coleman Chalet 9 CV

Coleman Chalet 9 CV

4.1  (14) Summary
vjulie
vjulieVIC5 posts
 
Gordigear Explorer Plus

Gordigear Explorer Plus

5.0  (9) Summary
Simon
Simon2 posts
  ERT01
The bench mark for soft shell rttQuality components and top quality workmanship.
The benchmark of soft shell rtt.
Had mine 3 years in the uk all weathers no problems at all.
And looks the part when folded down on the roof Show details
OZtrail Tourer

OZtrail Tourer

3.5  (20) Summary
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LTCOL
LTCOLQLD2 posts
  9
OzTent RV-5

OzTent RV-5

3.0  (34) Summary
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Chada
ChadaVIC2 posts
 
Great Tent SHT CUSTOMER SERVICEGreat Tent SHT CUSTOMER SERVICE.

They will try everything to not honor the warranty Show details

Macpac Apollo

Macpac Apollo

3.7  (15) Summary
Jonathan F.
Jonathan F.
 
BCF Wanderer Magnitude

BCF Wanderer Magnitude

3.9  (12) Summary
Colic
ColicNSW47 posts
  4 Person
San Hima Kalbarri Gen 2

San Hima Kalbarri Gen 2

4.6  (8) Summary
Michael Thompson
Michael Thompson3 posts
  Fair Incentive
BlackWolf Mantis

BlackWolf Mantis

3.9  (11) Summary
Steve
SteveNSW
  II
OzTent RV-4

OzTent RV-4

3.6  (13) Summary
covo
covoNSW9 posts
 
Over priced for the qualityWould not buy a Oztent again. We were camping on the weekend. The wind bent the main upright pole. $65 to get a new one to replace as you can’t bend it straight without creating a kink. Something you would expect from a $200 tent not a tent costing over a $1000. Very disappointing given how much this costs. Show details
Outdoor Connection Bedarra 2R

Outdoor Connection Bedarra 2R

4.4  (8) Summary
$699.95RRP
Barbara C
Barbara CSA5 posts
 
Best tent everBought the Bedarra shortly after it was released. Go camping every xmas for 10 days, where strong winds prevail.
Its been reliable from day one. Easy set up and pull down. I (female age 70) can do it myself, but an extra hand is always welcome.
The ventilation design with this tent is the best l ever seen.
Would buy it again. Show details
Kathmandu Retreat 360

Kathmandu Retreat 360

4.0  (9) Summary
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Nick
NickNSW3 posts
 
Black Wolf Turbo Lite Twin

Black Wolf Turbo Lite Twin

2.9  (21) Summary
melc
melc29 posts
  Verified 300
Coleman Instant Up Gold Series

Coleman Instant Up Gold Series

2.9  (22) Summary
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Rico
RicoVIC5 posts
  6P
Zip goes tent goes and the zip is cheapI have had it for 4 years and the zip is busted, the teeth have gone on it. Coleman have terrible service for spare parts and divert you to another company that specialise in parts for everything. I feel like I bought a $700 zip because IF i can find a entire new zipper ill have to sew it in. Show details
Zempire Aerobase 3

Zempire Aerobase 3

4.8  (6) Summary
James Peterson
James PetersonWA2 posts
 
Outdoor Air ShelterWhen it comes to handling tough weather conditions, the Aerobase 3 is an absolute champ. It fearlessly faces heavy rain and powerful winds, shielding you from the elements like a superhero. Show details
Speedy Pop Up Tent

Speedy Pop Up Tent

3.9  (8) Summary
flykester
flykester6 posts
 
San Hima Kalbarri

San Hima Kalbarri

5.0  (5) Summary
Katherine Lim
Katherine Lim
  Verified
cozy &great on outdoorfast delivery and can't wait to use it on outdoor Show details
Adventure Kings Roof Top Tent

Adventure Kings Roof Top Tent

2.7  (21) Summary
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Michael
Michael2 posts
 
Adventure Kings
Adventure Kings   DM   
More
Black Wolf Turbo Lite

Black Wolf Turbo Lite

3.8  (8) Summary
Ketch
KetchWA7 posts
  450
Macpac Microlight

Macpac Microlight

4.3  (6) Summary
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Darryl W.
Darryl W.
 
Adventure Kings Weekender

Adventure Kings Weekender

2.3  (28) Summary
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Oliver L.
Oliver L.
 
Adventure Kings
Adventure Kings   DM   
More
Macpac Wanaka

Macpac Wanaka

4.6  (5) Summary
Kaza
KazaNSW3 posts
 
Black Wolf Tuff Dome

Black Wolf Tuff Dome

3.2  (10) Summary
Mark
Mark
  Dome
Macpac Nautilus

Macpac Nautilus

4.4  (5) Summary
$449.99RRP
James Moriarty
James MoriartyVIC
 
$2,199.99RRP
Kurtis Goodwin
Kurtis Goodwin
 
AverageDecent price and easy set up and pack down however condensation builds very easily and it will keep you up all night long in windy areas. the canvas slaps around and makes lots of noise Show details
Oztent RV-3

Oztent RV-3

2.8  (11) Summary
Ian M.
Ian M.VIC
 

Types of tents

A tent set up on a grassy hill while the sun sets in the background.

There are tents for all kinds of stays, whether you’re hiking, doing regular camping, or need a tent for recreation, such as for at the beach or backyard fun with the kids.

Tents are often described by their shape - here’s what the different terms mean.

Ridge tents

These are shaped like a triangular prism, and are erected with 2 vertical poles at each end with a horizontal pole across the ‘ridge’. Because of their sloping sides, they’re usually not particularly roomy inside.

Dome tents

Dome tents are a popular tent type that have flexible poles that bend, which allow for their dome shape. These give you a lot of head height, are easy to set up and pack down, and are generally lighter than cabin tents.

A geodesic tent is a type of dome tent that’s created with crossover poles as well as side hoops, making it sturdy enough to handle extreme weather conditions, including heavy snow and high winds. Because of the extra components, they’re also heavier and more difficult to set up.

Cabin tents

Popular with families, these tents are more square shaped, and these vertical walls make the interior of these tents more spacious - so much so that you can stand up in them. Sometimes these family tents also have different rooms, and are large enough to fit a table and chairs inside.

Swags

Swags are compact tents that sleep 1 or sometimes 2 people. They usually have an inbuilt mattress and are low to the ground, requiring campers to crawl into them. They’re minimal, but are lightweight and offer good insulation, making them popular hiking tents.

Pop-up tents

Also called instant-up tents, these are designed to be quick to pitch. They just need to be unfolded, “popped out”, and pegged down, like this Instant-Up Coleman Tent. Their simplicity makes them well-suited for picnics and beach outings where you might just need a bit of shade for a few hours.

However, these tents aren’t only used as beach shelters; these types of tents have improved in quality over the years, and some are hardy enough to handle rougher weather conditions.

Teepees

An instantly recognisable structure, teepee tents are conical in shape and commonly used nowadays as ‘glamping’ tents or in backyards for children to play in.

Other types of tents

Car tents, like the Adventure Kings Roof Top Tent, are another type of tent that’s popular with campers. They’re usually set up atop or partially atop a car, with the sleeping spaces directly on top of a car and a ladder to climb up. They often also have an awning to give car campers a little extra privacy in the space beside their car.

When you don’t have access to bathrooms at your campsite and want a bit of privacy (or are just a bit selective about where you pop a squat), you can also buy a toilet tent to give you a sense of seclusion wherever you are. Shower tents, like this Joolca Shower Tent are also a great addition to your campsite - sometimes these are referred to as ensuite tents.

A woman climbing a ladder into a roof top car tent.

What should I look for when buying a tent?

Capacity

The capacity of a tent is determined by the number of sleeping bags that can fit on the floor space, not taking into account any storage space for bags or camping gear.

As a general rule, size up by 1 person if you want to be a bit more comfortable on your trip and have some extra room for your gear. Those backpacking tend to stick to the sleeping capacity listed, while families often go up 2 or even 3 sizes to accommodate active kids.

Seasonality

Many tents are designed with specific outdoor conditions in mind, and often have a season they’re suited for which can tell you how effective they’ll be at keeping you warm, cool, or dry.

  • 2-season tents are most suitable for spring and summer camping, and don’t offer much protection from wind and rain. However, they’re usually the most lightweight.
  • 3-season tents are popular because they’re suited for camping in an Australian spring, summer, or autumn, and can handle moderate to heavy rainfall while still being relatively light.
  • 4-season tents will keep you warm and dry regardless of the season, and are usually pricier and heavier due to their more durable materials and construction.

If you’re planning on camping in high altitudes or mountainous areas with high winds, you can even find 5-season tents that give you maximum protection.

Tent material

The durability of tent material usually depends on its seasonality and price. Here’s a brief overview of what to expect from different fabrics.

  • Nylon is thin and lightweight, and is often coated for extra UV protection and strength, however will degrade over time with sun exposure.
  • Polyester is thicker, sturdier, and more sun-resistant than nylon, and is often treated with a coating that reduces condensation. However, a polyester tent will cost more.
  • Canvas or cotton tents are long-lasting and breathable, so you’re kept cool in summer and warm in winter. These can however get quite heavy, particularly when they’re wet.
  • Polycotton is lightweight, strong, and most often has a waterproof coating.

You should also consider the denier of the tent fabric. The higher the denier, the thicker, stronger, and more durable the material of your tent is. This means it’ll also be more waterproof and wind-resistant.

Keep an eye out for tents treated with a UV-protective coating, as these tents are less prone to degradation out in the Aussie sun.

Ventilation

A well-ventilated tent is key if you want to avoid a build up of condensation inside your tent, particularly if you’re camping in a humid Australian climate.

Windows on a tent that allow air to flow through it will help you have a more comfortable sleep - and dry gear. Look for mesh windows that can be zipped up and down, ideally with large flaps covering the zip to keep the rain out.

Features

Some tents have a few extra features that can make your tent stay a bit more comfortable and practical, however the more features, the heavier and the pricier your tent will be.

  • Internal pockets. Some tents have small interior pockets that let you store the essentials that you might need to reach for during the night, like a torch, gloves, or an extra pair of socks.
  • Electrical cord access. If you need power access into your tent (such as for a lamp), then some tents have a small zip in the tent wall which you can feed a power cord through.
  • Ceiling hook. This comes in handy if you have a portable lantern that you want to hang up in your tent.
  • Sunroof. A sunroof in a tent is typically a clear panel on the ceiling that lets the sunlight (or moonlight) in. It should have an opaque cover that can be zipped up during the night.

Extra layout options

In addition to figuring out the shape of your tent and how many rooms and internal spaces you want it to have, there are also a few accessories that can make your tent feel a lot more like home.

An awning on a tent can be propped up with tent poles, creating extra shelter perfect for putting a couple of chairs under.

A vestibule is a protected area at the front or side of a tent that’s outside of the tent walls but protected by a rain fly. It’s a handy place to store a hiking pack and extra gear away from where you sleep.

While having a tent with these features is a useful way to create extra space and functionality, keep in mind that these make a tent heavier and longer to set up and pack down.

How much should you spend on a camping tent?

A tent can cost anywhere from $30 to $5000 and more, so how much you fork out for one usually depends on your use for it.

If you just want a tent that the kids can pop up and play with in the backyard, then a cheap tent should suffice. However, if you expect to be camping out in rougher weather, then most decent tents will set you back at least $400.

Keep in mind that the more features you want your tent to have, the more it’ll cost. However, if you expect to be getting a lot of use out of your tent, then a sturdier tent with higher quality materials will likely be a worthwhile investment.

After all, a nice tent might get you out of the house and have you spending more time exploring the great outdoors.

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