Best Toothpastes

When it comes to toothpaste, budget brands and household names offer an avalanche of toothpastes, including whitening toothpaste, enamel protection, anti-sensitivity and natural, organic toothpaste.

But how do you get past the marketing hype and choose a product that’s right for the health and look of your teeth? Continue Reading...

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Rating
Toothpaste Type
Fluoride Used

Based on 1,750 reviews
BioMinF

BioMinF 🏆 2024

4.8  (549) Summary
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Tatiana A.
Tatiana A.NSW
  Fair Incentive
BioMinI've been using BioMin Toothpaste for over a year, and I really enjoy it. It is really soft it works remarkably well, leaving my teeth feeling perfectly clean after every use. Show details
BioMin C

BioMin C 🏆 2024

4.9  (78) Summary
Emily F
Emily FVIC3 posts
  Fair Incentive Verified
Stronger teethMy husband has been using this toothpaste and in the past he has had problems with his teeth (lots of fillings), probably due to weak enamel. But after using Biomin for a year, he had no issues at his last dentist visit. He isn't a fan of fluoride so this is a really good option for him and seems to work. Show details
Biomin F for Kids

Biomin F for Kids

4.7  (27) Summary
Emily F
Emily FVIC3 posts
  Fair Incentive Verified
Good for enamel hypoplasiaWe got this for my 8 yr old son because he has enamel hypoplasia, so his teeth are more vulnerable to decay and he really needs to look after them well. After using Biomin for a year, he has had no problems with his teeth at his last two dentist visits and they have said to keep using the Biomin for him, so it seems to be doing the job. Show details
Cedel Spearmint

Cedel Spearmint

4.7  (18) Summary
Robert Wilson.
Robert Wilson.
 
Excellent ProductI used to use the more expensive, better known toothpaste brands but switched to Cedel Toothpastes years ago and couldn't be happier, Australian made (& owned) products, with fluoride and whitening at a fraction of the price of the others which are imported, using any brand other than Cedel makes no sense at all. Show details
Cedel Sensitive

Cedel Sensitive

4.4  (22) Summary
Jessica
Jessica8 posts
 
Works well but doesn't give a clean feelingHas worked with my tooth sensitivity same as other brands.
I am disappointed the toothpaste tastes like its for children. Very sweet & no mint. It also doesn't foam & feel like it doesn't do anything unless i use large amounts. Show details
Verusca W.
Verusca W.
 
Front tooth fillings meltedThree days using and all my front tooth fillings fall off... In shock and trying despaired to found a dentist to fix it. Show details
Colgate Total

Colgate Total

2.6  (122) Summary
John151
John151AU32 posts
 
No responseEnquired about the difference between Total, Triple Action, Triple Action Cavity, etc and which one was best for me. Sadly, did not receive the courtesy of a response.
Colgate
Colgate   DM   
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Hi John, we'd like to help. Please contact our Consumer Care team on 1800 802 307 if you have some questions.

Pental AIM Range

Pental AIM Range

4.0  (13) Summary
Shane
ShanePerth44 posts
 
Seems to be alot better for your mouthOnly recently i used aim as i bought a 3 pack and it does clean your teeth.
It would be good if it was still made in Australia but its not.
Does not leave a after taste and it doesnt froth to much in the mouth.
The taste of this toothpaste is to be desired but tolerable. I will buy again, but different flavour next time. Show details
Joe C.
Joe C.VIC
 
Does not contain dangerous chemicalsI am using it because it is the only toothpaste that does not contain Parabens and Sodium Sacharin which is petroleum coal tar based and can be carcinogenic Show details
White Glo Deep Stain Remover

White Glo Deep Stain Remover

2.8  (20) Summary
Alan
AlanTAS
 
I don't use anything elseI have been using this product in all of it's variations for more than ten years. I had some discolouring on some of my front teeth and started using White Glo. It worked a treat. No side effects at all. I thought that it was good value with a toothbrush and toothpicks. Show details
Red Seal Smokers

Red Seal Smokers

4.0  (8) Summary
davidweh
davidwehNSW24 posts
 
One of the best!What I like about this toothpaste is that it’s breathe freshener effect STAYS much longer than any others I’ve ever used! Sadly it’s also VERY hard to find and not readily available as others of the same brand!
It has a much stronger mint flavour and leaves teeth much cleaner … Show details
LdB
LdBSydney2 posts
 
Dimension
DimensionAU6 posts
 
Colgate Optic White

Colgate Optic White

2.1  (72) Summary
Andrew H.
Andrew H.
 
Doesn’t whiteDidn’t see a change in colour in my teeth. Started from a light yellow and more than 4 weeks later, still at a light yellow.
No issues as a general tooth paste, but bought it to whiten. Show details
Sensodyne 24/7 Protection Range

Sensodyne 24/7 Protection Range

2.0  (95) Summary
Annette D.
Annette D.
 
Dreadful effects from toothpaste!!!!!Almost immediately caused sore gums and inside lips very sore... Painful to eat... Stopped using 48 hrs ago and still sore and painful... I ve never had this issue before! I was recommended this toothpaste by my dentist. I think Sensodyne should review their products... Show details
Steradent Denture Paste

Steradent Denture Paste

2.8  (15) Summary
Stuart R.
Stuart R.NSW2 posts
 
UnhappyWhy can't I buy Streadent denture paste any more. It's out of stock every where I look.
Macleans Extreme Clean

Macleans Extreme Clean

2.4  (27) Summary
Peter  Jill
Peter Jill3 posts
 
Macleans has changed, WhyWhy has has Macleans Extreme Clean taken the RED Strip out of the tooth paste???? Show details
Colgate Max Fresh

Colgate Max Fresh

3.7  (7) Summary
Mike R
Mike RVIC47 posts
 
Ticks some boxesYes, nice color, flavour and seems to clean ok... but way TOO much foaming agent, and other unnessesary chemicals I believe. Will not buy again unless its the only one available. Show details
Colgate
Colgate   DM   
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Sensodyne Repair & Protect

Sensodyne Repair & Protect

2.5  (19) Summary
kcd1961
kcd1961NSW22 posts
 
Colgate Sensitive Pro-Relief

Colgate Sensitive Pro-Relief

1.8  (103) Summary
danny_hannan
danny_hannan2 posts
 
Colgate
Colgate   DM   
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White Glo Coconut Oil Shine

White Glo Coconut Oil Shine

3.7  (6) Summary
Chelsea
ChelseaSA5 posts
 
Can't live without itThis flavour is perfect for autistic / NeuroDivergent people who find the flavour of mint too intense. I wish White Glo would provide samples to Psychologists and Autism care providers, to help increase dental health for people with sensory processing issues. Show details
Colgate Advanced Whitening

Colgate Advanced Whitening

1.9  (39) Summary
Chris
Chris
 
Horrible do not use!!On the first use my throat began to close up I thought I just had a viral infection until a week later it wasn’t going away so I googled reviews and came across so many others having the same issues of red bumps and closing throat. Wasn’t until now that I made the connection that it’s the toothpaste absolutely wild! Show details
Colgate
Colgate   DM   
More

We're sorry you had a less than positive experience. If you haven't already reached out to our Consumer Care team please call us on 1800 802 307 so that we can help you further.

Oral-B Pro Health

Oral-B Pro Health

1.6  (217) Summary
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Elena M.
Elena M.NSW
  All-Around Protection
Red Seal Herbal

Red Seal Herbal

3.8  (5) Summary
Judke
JudkeVIC11 posts
 
Reduced the sizeI used to buy this and the Baking Soda toothpaste almost exclusively. But now they seem to have a lot less in the tube. I'm having to squeeze a lot to get the toothpaste out so it looks like an old tube, but I only just opened it. I would be the amount in the tube would fit in a tube half the size. I feel ripped off. Show details
Oral-B Gum Care & Enamel Restore

Oral-B Gum Care & Enamel Restore

1.4  (88) Summary
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BrisbaneEp
BrisbaneEp2 posts
 
Destroys gums, doesn't repair themApparently I'm not the only person here who wrote a negative review on Oral-B's website and had it taken down. This toothpaste is awful! I took a sample size with me while traveling and I ended up with ulcers on my gums. Don't even bother trying it unless you want to destroy your mouth.
GC Tooth Mousse Plus

GC Tooth Mousse Plus

4.3  (3) Summary
SunshineMantaray
SunshineMantarayNSW
  Verified
Miracle Teeth

Miracle Teeth

4.3  (3)
Mizz d
Mizz d
 
Its a must haveIts actually cleans and makes your teeth look great I've used other products and this is the best by far 100 percent happy with my results definitely i recommend this

Oral-B Gum Care & Whitening

Oral-B Gum Care & Whitening

2.5  (6) Summary
Joy K.
Joy K.NSW
 
GreatThis is great toothpaste, helps with my bleeding gums caused by medication love it Show details ·  1
Dave
DaveTAS2 posts
 
Australian madeI try to buy Australian wherever possible. The one thing we stock up on when we go to the mainland is Dentitex Sensitive Plus. I've been using it for years and at half the price of big name overseas made sensitive toothpaste it's great. Show details
Sensodyne Daily Care

Sensodyne Daily Care

5.0  (2) Summary
suzette m.
suzette m.VIC6 posts
 

Family of three happily brushing teeth in front of mirror

What are the benefits of toothpaste?

A good toothpaste, combined with the correct brushing technique and toothbrush, will maintain the health of your teeth and gums.

Toothpaste is designed to remove food particles caught between teeth, prevent the formation of plaque (a sticky film of bacteria coating teeth), and provide cavity protection. It also gently polishes your teeth, which helps keep your chompers smooth and shiny.

What toothpaste do dentists recommend?

When it comes to toothpaste, dentists don’t often recommend a particular one - and if they do, it will depend on the specific condition of your teeth. For example, the Colgate toothpaste NeutraFluor 5000 is often prescribed for people at high risk of developing cavities, and has a high amount of fluoride (5000ppmm) in it.

Other than this, dentists recommend that your toothpaste should have at least two key ingredients to work effectively - a mild abrasive and some fluoride.

Key ingredients

Abrasive: All toothpaste needs to contain a mild abrasive in order to be effective. The abrasive quality is what gently scrubs against teeth to remove the bacteria and food residue that causes stains.

Fluoride toothpaste: When it comes to learning about toothpastes, you can’t get far without encountering the term ‘fluoride.’

Fluoride is a trace mineral found in nature, including water, rocks and plants. Also, the enamel in our teeth actually contains fluoride. Fluoride is widely regarded by dentists as a repair agent that protects enamel, and works as a barrier against bacteria.

Sometimes fluoride-free toothpaste needs to be used (for example, in children's toothpastes, but other than this dentists generally don’t recommend natural toothpastes.

Types of Toothpaste

Teeth whitening toothpaste

These toothpastes are different from other teeth whitening products, as they won’t contain hydrogen peroxide to bleach teeth. They work by scrubbing away surface stains on teeth to make teeth whiter and brighter when the stains are removed.

To do this, whitening toothpastes increase either the strength or quantity of the abrasive ingredient in the product. While this may effectively whiten teeth, a stronger abrasive - especially when used daily - can wear down teeth enamel over time. This can lead to demineralisation of teeth, greater risk of cavities and tooth decay.

Check the instructions of a whitening toothpaste carefully to avoid this. It’s best to use these toothpastes occasionally (for example, once a week) rather than daily, to be safe.

Plaque/ Tartar Removal

Generally, most toothpastes already have the right ingredients to help avoid that sticky film of bacteria forming on your teeth.

Ingredients like sodium pyrophosphate and xanthan gum (also a thickener) are commonly found in plaque and tartar removal toothpastes. This is because they pull tartar into saliva, which stops it from forming on teeth - you can then spit it out with your toothpaste.

Flossing is also a great way to avoid plaque from forming on your teeth, as it gets all the food residue out of the nooks and crannies between chompers.

These toothpastes work best for preventing the build-up of plaque and tartar, but aren’t as effective at removing tartar already on teeth. This task is best left to a dentist, who’ll need to use special instruments for ‘scaling’ - removing the hard, calcified deposit from your teeth professionally.

Sensitivity Relief

Some people experience sensitivity, discomfort or pain when they consume certain foods and drinks - particularly those that are extremely hot or cold. Since that first bit of ice cream should be a source of pleasure, not pain, choosing the right sensitivity relief toothpaste can help.

Sensitivity can occur when the enamel is very porous, and unprotected, exposing the nerves in the dentin under your enamel. These sensitive toothpastes are designed to desensitive the nerves in the tooth that cause the pain, and some may contain potassium nitrate to restore enamel over time.

Sensitive formulas may also contain a much gentler abrasive, to avoid wearing away any more precious enamel.

Since many brands and products are similar, choosing the right one for your teeth will often be a case of trial and error. Some popular brands include Colgate Sensitive Pro Relief and Sensodyne.

Kids Toothpaste

There are plenty of appealing toothpastes for kids on the market. Oral B toothpastes for kids feature Mickey Mouse or Anna from Frozen, while the Colgate kids toothpaste has a Spiderman theme. Fruity flavours are tastier to kids than the strong, bitter bite of spearmint found in adult’s toothpastes.

Apart from the search to find a toothpaste that your child finds fun or tasty enough to use every day, there’s another consideration when it comes to toothpaste for children and babies.

  • Babies and toddlers up to 18 months: You should avoid giving baby toothpaste to your child, even if it’s ‘baby toothpaste.’ Babies this young will end up swallowing toothpaste, and some chemical ingredients can be dangerous if ingested - especially fluoride.

  • Children 18 months to 6 years: Choose a fluoride-free toothpaste for your child. Since children often swallow toothpaste (especially if it’s a yummy flavour), they can consume fluoride. Done daily, this can lead to fluorosis - a condition that causes large white spots to form on teeth. Fluorosis generally only occurs when permanent teeth are growing - so kids are at special risk.

Toothpaste ingredients

There is a lot of marketing spin in toothpaste advertising, and it can be easy to be swept away on foamy dreams of cleaner, whiter, stronger teeth.

The best way to determine whether a toothpaste is cut out for the job of cleaning your teeth, preventing cavities and the build-up of plaque and tartar is to examine the ingredients list.

The Abrasive

Common abrasives include calcium carbonate, hydrated silica, and silica gels. These abrasives shouldn’t be so rough, however, that they wear down your enamel.

Be careful with the quantity of abrasives in whitening toothpastes in particular, which may have a higher concentration of abrasive to scrub at stains.

Humectant

This prevents toothpastes from hardening when it reacts to air. Common examples are glycerol and sorbitol.

Binder

Since toothpastes need to work as both a solid and liquid during the brushing process, binders stabilise the formula so it can do this. Common binding agents are carboxymethyl cellulose, hydroxyethyl cellulose and for natural toothpastes, you’ll often see gum carrageenan.

Detergents

These reduce surface tension to help loosen plaque that’s deposited on teeth. Detergents often double are surfactants, or foaming agents. Sodium lauryl sulphate (or SLS) is the most commonly used toothpaste detergent, but it can irritate skin, along with other detergents. It’s also used in industrial cleaning products.

Flavour and Sweeteners

The flavour of most toothpastes is a variation of traditional mint, including peppermint, spearmint or wintergreen. Common natural inclusions are mint oil, eucalyptus or other safe essential oils.

Common sweeteners include xylitol - a natural sweetener, sorbitol - semi-sweet in nature and sodium saccharine, which has been found to cause cancer in rats. Aspartame is another artificial sweetener with mixed reviews on its negative health consequences - but best to avoid if you can.

Preservatives

Avoid parabens, which are chemical preservatives known to disrupt hormones. The following often have mixed scientific evidence on their harm, but it’s best to avoid them to be safe: propylene glycol - both a humectant and preservative. Benzoates like sodium benzoate, and potassium sorbate.

While it's not a preservative but an antibacterial, also avoid triclosan - an antibacterial agent that’s also used as a pesticide.

Natural toothpastes

Natural toothpaste ingredients are more likely to be organic, vegan, and fluoride-free. Red Seal's Herbal Toothpaste is a popular example of a toothpaste that ticks all three of these boxes.

Natural toothpastes work by replacing common synthetic abrasives with natural ones - which is often marketed as the star ingredient.

They’re often used in the formulation of natural teeth whitening toothpastes. According to reviews and other anecdotal evidence, many people experience positive teeth whitening results using natural products.

However, most don’t include added fluoride, which according to the Australian Dentist’s Association, isn’t recommended in a toothpaste as it won’t prevent cavities and ‘fight’ plaque.

Charcoal toothpaste

Activated charcoal is a fine, black powder that's become something of a wonder ingredient in the teeth-whitening world in recent years.

Charcoal toothpaste benefits are mainly that it has a magnetic effect on the toxins, dirt, bacteria, and food residue that cause stains. The activated charcoal draws them out, leaving you with a cleaner smile.

Keep in mind activated charcoal can be abrasive (and slowly wear away the enamel on your teeth), so it’s best to only use it occasionally, rather than every day.

Baking soda toothpaste

Baking soda scrubs away at stains on teeth, but can be abrasive and damaging in high quantities, or when used too frequently.

Rather than buying a baking soda toothpaste that you use twice daily, it could be more cost-effective (and safe to teeth), to buy food-grade baking soda, mix it with some water to make a paste, and brush it onto teeth once every 1-2 weeks for safe whitening results.

Some people also experience mouth ulcers and stinging after using baking soda, or whitening toothpastes with baking soda as the active whitening agent.

Clay

Many natural toothpastes contain clay, like the Red Seal Natural Toothpaste, which contains bentonite clay. Bentonite clay draws out toxins (similarly to activated charcoal), and also works as a mild abrasive.

Wrapping up

The type of toothpaste that's righ tfor you will depend on a number of factors, including: your age, whether you have any dental conditions that you need to take care of, any cosmetic concerns you have about your teeth, and whether you prefer natural ingredients to chemicals. The right toothpaste formula doesn't need to be expensive to work, as long as it has safe, effective ingredients that keep your teeth, gums and smile healthy.

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